Duke Medical Center Library & Archives

Explore: Zotero
Posted On: Thursday, August 5, 2010 - 09:30 by Beverly Murphy

What is it? Free citation manager!

Zotero is a free Firefox extension to help you collect, manage, cite, and share your bibliographic references right inside the browser. Zotero allows you to collect information on books, journal articles, and other resources easily with a single click. Doing more than just collecting research articles? No problem! You can save entire web pages, PDFs, images, and links in your library, and Zotero will automatically sense what type of material you are collecting. Zotero's interface allows you to quickly organize your research sources by dragging them into folders, taking notes, or tagging the content. When you are ready to use your data, simply drag and drop your bibliography anywhere. There is...

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Categories: Explore Tools

Tags: research

Explore: Map Builder
Posted On: Thursday, August 5, 2010 - 09:23 by Beverly Murphy

What is it? Free Customized Google Maps!
Map Builder lets you tag locations on a Google map and publish it on your own website. This is useful if you need to identify a group of people or a number of specific locations. The instructions are clearly written and easy to follow. You start with an Excel spread sheet that contains the data you want to identify on a map. Maps can cover any national, state or local areas. Convert the file to a csv (comma separated value) format and you are ready to go.

This map of workshop participants...

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Categories: Explore Tools

Explore: Google Forms
Posted On: Thursday, August 5, 2010 - 09:21 by Beverly Murphy

What is it? Free Online Surveys!
Google Forms is part of the Google Docs suite of free, web-based applications that are increasingly used by people working collaboratively or from multiple locations. While all the Google Docs are useful, this month we feature Google Forms, which allows you to create free, online surveys with a simple web editor. Google Forms automatically gathers survey responses and stores them in a Google Spreadsheet and formats some of the responses graphically using pie charts and bar graphs.

To...

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Categories: Explore Tools

Calcium Supplements May Increase Heart Attack Risk
Posted On: Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 14:00 by Adrianne Leonardelli

Effect of calcium supplements on risk of myocardial infarction and cardiovascular events: meta-analysis.
Bolland MJ, Avenell A, Baron JA, Grey A, Maclennan GS, Gamble GD, Reid IR.
BMJ. 2010 Jul 29;341:c3691. PMID: 20671013.

Abstract
Objective: To investigate whether calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Design: Patient level and trial level meta-analyses. Data sources: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central...

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Ovid has a new interface!
Posted On: Monday, August 2, 2010 - 11:40 by Beverly Murphy

Ovid has tweaked its interface again. Most of the functions will continue to work in the same way as they did before.

Please note that the Results Manager has changed. You no longer save, print and export citations from the bottom of the results page - you now need to look for a small bar at the top of your results that will allow you to do these functions.

Look for the Keep Selected link to view, print or save items that you have checked off from the results.

More information about Ovid's new interface is available online at the Ovid site - look to the lower right corner for some short online tutorials to view the new features.

Duke Medicine Faculty Center now open
Posted On: Monday, July 26, 2010 - 09:28 by Beverly Murphy


Watch the video introducing the new Duke Medicine Faculty Center, conveniently located in the Library just off the walkway between the Hospital and Clinics. Offering comfortable seating, meeting tables, computer stations, and complimentary drinks and snacks, the Faculty Center provides the opportunity to connect with colleagues or unwind from a busy day.
Open 24/7 to faculty.

iPads: Accessing Library Resources from Home
Posted On: Friday, July 23, 2010 - 14:25 by Beverly Murphy

Those of you with iPads (and those of you still mulling the purchase over) may be curious about how to access library resources on your iPad. If you are on the Duke wireless network, you should have few problems accessing our tools. Some of our resources may not look perfect on the mobile Safari browser, but as long as you are on the Diamonds wireless network, you should not be prompted for additional user names and passwords.

If you are at home, however, you may run into some problems. The OIT Help Desk reports that the Duke and DHTS VPNs will not work on the iPad. Until they work out a solution, you will not be able to access some of the Medical Center Library's resources, which do require the VPN, on the device.

The good news is that many of our resources will work....

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Tags: pubmed

New Guidelines: vaginal birth after cesarean delivery
Posted On: Thursday, July 22, 2010 - 11:30 by Beverly Murphy

Attempting a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is a safe and appropriate choice for most women who have had a prior cesarean delivery, including for some women who have had two previous cesareans, according to guidelines released today by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

The cesarean delivery rate in the US increased dramatically over the past four decades, from 5% in 1970 to over 31% in 2007. Before 1970, the standard practice was to perform a repeat cesarean after a prior cesarean birth. During the 1970s, as women achieved successful VBACs, it became viewed as a reasonable option for some women. Over time, the VBAC rate...

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Redesigned MedlinePlus
Posted On: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 10:05 by Beverly Murphy



Today MedlinePlus has a completely redesigned site & a new logo for both the English and Spanish pages. All the same information is still be available with some new features and enhancements. The new design emphasizes search, makes navigation more intuitive, and highlights frequently used content. Check it out!

What is MedlinePlus?

MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health's Web site for patients and...

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Statins may reduce risk of prostate cancer returning
Posted On: Friday, July 2, 2010 - 14:48 by Beverly Murphy

Statin medication use and the risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: 
Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) Database.
Hamilton RJ, Banez LL, Aronson WJ, Terris MK, Platz EA, Kane CJ, Presti JC Jr, Amling CL, Freedland SJ.

Cancer. 2010 Jun 28. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 20586112.


Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although controversial, evidence suggests statins may reduce the risk of advanced prostate cancer (PC), and recently statin use was associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) reductions among men without PC. The authors sought to examine the association between statin use and PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy...

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Angiotensin-receptor blockade and risk of cancer
Posted On: Thursday, June 17, 2010 - 09:00 by Adrianne Leonardelli

Angiotensin-receptor blockade and risk of cancer: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.
Sipahi I, Debanne SM, Rowland D, Simon DI, Fang JC.
The Lancet Oncology. 2010 June 14; Early Online Publication.


This meta-analysis suggests that people taking ARBs (angiotensin-receptor blockers) may be at increased risk for developing cancer. The...

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Explore: Jing
Posted On: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 13:31 by Beverly Murphy

Jing is a free screencasting and screen capture tool from TechSmith, the same company that creates the well-known but not free Camtasia and SnagIt. Jing is incredibly easy to use for quick videos: narrate a PowerPoint or record a video of your computer screen for free.

Why offer a free version when the same company sells software to do the same thing? Jing is more limited: there are few or no editing options for your videos and there is a 5-minute limit for video length. But this is perfect for showing quick how-tos with software or for narrating a quick presentation.

Check out more cool tools to improve your work,...

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Categories: Explore Tools

Explore: PubGet
Posted On: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 13:28 by Beverly Murphy

Pubget is an alternate interface for PubMed that makes it ridiculously easy to get PDFs of articles. Set your library preferences to Duke University, then search for an article or subject. Pubget delivers your results with whatever PDFs Duke subscribes to pre-loaded with your results.

There is a downside to Pubget, and it’s in the searching. Pubget strips out all the cool mapping and indexing that happen behind the scenes in PubMed (or with the MeSH database, if you’re used to using that), and instead serves up results that are sometimes befuddling. We all know there are probably more than 10,000 articles on heart attacks in PubMed, but that’s all Pubget finds. So if you are trying to do a thorough search, stick with PubMed. Now, if you just need to find a PDF for an article you...

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Categories: Explore Tools

Tags: pubmed

Explore: CiteULike
Posted On: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 09:36 by Beverly Murphy

What is it?

CiteULike is a free service that allows you to store, organize, and share the scholarly papers you are reading or intend to read. It’s considered a social bookmarking site because your library can be shared with others so you can easily see who is reading the same thing. So far almost 4 million articles have been indexed! It’s a great way to connect with scholars near and far and organize your own scholarly adventures.

It’s pretty simple to get started. Once you set up a profile and install a "bookmarklet" you simply click on a button in your browser to have an article added to your library (all the citation details are extracted to save you time and effort). You can tag it with keywords, add graphics and PDFs, share it with a specific group of...

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Categories: Explore Tools

Tags: research

New database of Alzheimer's disease patients
Posted On: Monday, June 14, 2010 - 11:11 by Beverly Murphy

A new database of more than 4,000 Alzheimer’s disease patients who have participated in 11 industry-sponsored clinical trials was released on Friday by the Coalition Against Major Diseases (CAMD). According to the Critical Path Institute, which oversees the coalition, "This is the first database of combined clinical trials to be openly shared by pharmaceutical companies and made available to qualified researchers around the world. It is also the first effort of its kind to create a voluntary industry data standard that will help accelerate new treatment research on brain disease, as patients with other related brain diseases are expected to be added." CAMD is a formal consortium of pharmaceutical companies, research foundations and patient advocacy/voluntary health associations, with...

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