Duke Medical Center Library & Archives
October 2016 Archive

Online Payment of ILL Invoices is Here!
Posted On: Monday, October 31, 2016 - 15:03 by Beverly Murphy

As of November 1, 2016, you can pay your invoice for Interlibrary Loans (ILLs) online at https://payments.mclibrary.duke.edu/ill using a credit card. Just enter the invoice number, payment amount, and billing information.  This is a secure payment system which uses DukePay and meets all of Duke’s criteria for handling online credit card payments.

Copies from any of the Duke Library collections are still free to the Duke community. Duke patrons will only receive an invoice for a journal article if we have to get it from a non-Duke library. 

In early 2017, we hope to launch online payments by faculty and staff for fines and lost books, as well as links for giving...

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Categories: Alerts, Resource Updates

Get More from PubMed
Posted On: Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 15:57 by Brandi Tuttle

Have you ever wondered if you are getting all that you can from PubMed? Check out these tips and tricks to make sure you are finding all the research on your topic and getting free access to articles in the Duke collections.

1. Click on PubMed from the Medical Library’s Website to get full text available through Duke, or bookmark the link: https://mclibrary.duke.edu/pubmed

PubMed is liberally scattered throughout the Medical Library’s Website (on the main page under Quicklinks, Clinical Tools page, and more). Using one of these PubMed links...

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Categories: Databases, Resource Updates

Tags: pubmed, research, literature search, My NCBI

Making Information Free: Open Access & More
Posted On: Friday, October 7, 2016 - 13:56 by Patricia Thibodeau

Easy and immediate access to journal articles still remains a challenge. Even Duke cannot provide access to everything.  Journal prices have continued to increase year after year with more and more expensive journals being published. That means important clinical, research, and educational content can be locked up for months, years, or permanently, inaccessible to the patients, health providers, researchers, teachers and learners that need access to them.  This problem becomes even more massive when you look at access to information within developing countries, and can become an obstacle as Duke tries to work with global sites to reduce disparities in health, education, and research.

The following three movements are trying to ensure...

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Categories: Resource Updates

Tags: open access, journals, NIH Public Access Policy, publishing, open science, cope fund