Duke Medical Center Library & Archives
Category: From the Literature

Tips for Educators from JGME
Posted On: Monday, October 22, 2018 - 14:23 by Megan von Isenburg

The Journal of Graduate Medical Education recently published an article entitled "Staying Up to Date and Managing Information Overload" with handy tips. We've offered a sample below, or read the whole article here.

  • Work with a medical librarian. This was their number one tip, and we agree that this is an excellent place to start! We can help you set up alerts on the research and teaching topics of greatest interest to you! Reach out to us at 919.660.1100 or by filling out our online form.T
  • Join an education email discussion list, like...
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Categories: From the Literature

Tags: journals

2017 Guideline for High Blood Pressure
Posted On: Friday, November 17, 2017 - 18:56 by Jesse Akman

The 2017 ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults has just been accepted for publication in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. A two-part excerpt featuring 21 key points to remember is available on the ACC Website.

Need help finding current treatment guidelines? Make sure to Ask a Librarian...

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Categories: From the Literature

Tags: guidelines

Check Out Duke's DVD & Popular Reading Collections
Posted On: Monday, May 23, 2016 - 13:56 by Jamie Conklin

As a Duke student, staff, or faculty member, you can take advantage of a wide array of library collections, including DVDs and recreational reading. Here are some of the popular collections to check out:

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Categories: From the Literature

Tags: engel books

JAMA Says: Talk to Your Medical Librarian
Posted On: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 11:16 by Megan von Isenburg

Want to get published in JAMA? One way to improve your chances is to talk to your medical librarian.

In a viewpoint piece published on September 10, 2014, potential and future JAMA authors are encouraged to improve their review articles by summarizing the literature in a more systematic way. Written by a medical librarian, a physician, and the Deputy Editor, Clinical Reviews and Education for JAMA, the article lays out the process for doing so and exhorts authors to collaborate with a medical librarian. Extensive literature searches are difficult, and a medical librarian can provide expertise to facilitate the process, save time, and reduce bias in the...

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Categories: From the Literature

Tags: journals

Patient Self-Monitoring and Self-Titration for Hypertention
Posted On: Thursday, August 28, 2014 - 10:11 by Emily Mazure

Effect of Self-monitoring and Medication Self-titration on Systolic Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients at High Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: The TASMIN-SR Randomized Clinical Trial.

Authors: McManus RJ, Mant J, Haque MS, Bray EP, Bryan S, Greenfield SM, Jones MI, Jowett S, Little P, Penaloza C, Schwartz C, Shackleford H, Shovelton C, Varghese J, Williams B, Hobbs FD.

Importance: Self-monitoring of blood pressure with self-titration of antihypertensives (self-management) results in lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension, but there are no...

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Categories: From the Literature

Tags: research

Merry Christmas from BMJ
Posted On: Thursday, December 19, 2013 - 09:39 by Megan von Isenburg

The BMJ's Christmas edition is out, with such thought-provoking and ground-breaking research as:

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Categories: From the Literature

Google Scholar Not Enough for Systematic Reviews
Posted On: Saturday, November 2, 2013 - 14:05 by Adrianne Leonardelli

A recent article in BMC Medical Research Methodology, Google Scholar as Replacement for Systematic Literature Searches: Good Relative Recall and Precision are Not Enough, reports that "Google Scholar is not ready as a professional searching tool for tasks where structured retrieval methodology is necessary." For more details about the study, including its methods and results, see the structured abstract below.

BACKGROUND:
Recent research indicates a high recall in Google Scholar searches for systematic reviews. These reports raised high expectations of Google Scholar as a unified and easy to use search interface. However, studies on the coverage of Google Scholar rarely used the search interface in...

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Categories: From the Literature

Stay on Top of the Literature with the BrowZine App
Posted On: Friday, July 19, 2013 - 10:34 by Brandi Tuttle

Duke University Libraries is currently running a trial of BrowZine (think "browsing"), an app for ipads and Android tablets that enables you to browse, read, and monitor current journals in your subject areas.  BrowZine is compatible with Zotero, Dropbox, Evernote and other services (Mendeley and RefWorks coming soon!), allowing you to organize and manage your research seamlessly.  You may also save articles to your BrowZine pin board to read even when you don’t have Internet access.

Download BrowZine to your device by following these easy steps:
  • From your iPad or Android device, download BrowZine from the App Store or...
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Categories: Explore Tools, From the Literature, Resource Updates

Tags: apps

Tick-Borne Infection Borrelia Miyamotoi Discovered in the United States
Posted On: Friday, June 7, 2013 - 14:25 by Leila Ledbetter

The first U.S. case of human B. miyamotoi infection was reported in the New England Journal of Medicine in January.  The infection has been discovered in 18 patients in southern New England and neighboring New York by researchers at the Yale Schools of Public Health and Medicine.  Because it is so new, it does not yet have a name.

Blood tests are used to detect the infection which is spread by common deer ticks.  The viral-like illness is a distant relative of Lyme disease and it shares many similar symptoms to both Lyme and relapsing fever infections.  Symptoms can include fever, muscular aches and pains, headaches and fatigue, with a small portion also developing a rash.  Drugs such as doxycycline and amoxicillin, effective in combating Lyme...

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Categories: From the Literature

Three Reports Offer a Snapshot of US Health
Posted On: Monday, June 3, 2013 - 10:50 by Brandi Tuttle

Ready to see how 2012 as well as the last decade shaped up? Three different reports, paid for by US tax dollars, provide data which is crucial to understanding both the nation's current health as well as shaping its future.

Focusing this year on emergency care, this year's Health, United States, 2012 report from the National Center for Health Statistics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention details trends in health statistics.  View the entire report here or check out the Website to see data on selected topics such as age, risk factors, gender, health insurance and more. There are 10 charts just on emergency care alone "examining who uses the emergency...

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Categories: From the Literature

The U.S. Nursing Workforce: Trends in Supply and Education
Posted On: Thursday, May 2, 2013 - 08:46 by Adrianne Leonardelli

A new report from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), The U.S. Nursing Workforce: Trends in Supply and Education, presents data on the supply, distribution, and educational pipeline of nurses. This report analyzes data from a variety of sources to present recent trends and the current status of the registered nurse (RN) and licensed practical nurse (LPN) workforces.

Key findings:

  • Between 2008 and 2010, there were 2.8 million RNs and almost 700,000 LPNs working or seeking employment in the field of nursing.
  • In the past decade, the RN nursing workforce has increased by 24%.
  • Growth in the nursing workforce outpaced U.S. population growth. The number of RNs per 100,000 population (per capita) increased by 14...
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Categories: From the Literature

Tags: reports, nursing

Navigating Uncharted Territory
Posted On: Thursday, April 18, 2013 - 11:59 by Brandi Tuttle

Disasters, whether perpetrated by nature or humans, test our preparedness, adaptability, and ability to think and act quickly to a stressful situation. In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing, it is wise to take a few minutes and consider your own situation.

Does your workplace regularly discuss (and practice) responses to various disasters?  Reading about the experiences and responses in the Boston hospitals or with the Texas fertilizer plant explosion should renew our commitment to having these conversations and making emergency disaster response a "part of our...

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Categories: From the Literature

Tags: disasters

Aspirin Prevention for Venous Thromboembolism
Posted On: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 - 17:07 by Connie Schardt

BACKGROUND: About 20% of patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism have a recurrence within 2 years after the withdrawal of oral anticoagulant therapy. Extending anticoagulation prevents recurrences but is associated with increased bleeding. The benefit of aspirin for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism is unknown.

METHODS: In this multicenter, investigator-initiated, double-blind study, patients with first-ever unprovoked venous thromboembolism who had completed 6 to 18 months of oral anticoagulant treatment were randomly assigned to aspirin, 100 mg daily, or placebo for 2 years, with the option of extending the study treatment. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrence of venous thromboembolism, and major bleeding was the primary safety outcome....

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Categories: From the Literature

Helicopter vs ground emergency medical services and survival for adults with major trauma
Posted On: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 12:18 by Beverly Murphy


Association between helicopter vs ground emergency medical services and survival for adults with major trauma.

Galvagno SM Jr, Haut ER, Zafar SN, Millin MG, Efron DT, Koenig GJ Jr, Baker SP, Bowman SM, Pronovost PJ, Haider AH.
JAMA. 2012 Apr 18;307(15):1602-10.

CONTEXT: Helicopter emergency medical services and their possible effect on outcomes for traumatically injured patients remain a subject of debate. Because helicopter services are a limited and expensive resource, a methodologically rigorous investigation of its effectiveness compared with ground emergency medical services is warranted.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between the...

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Categories: From the Literature

Oral Bisphosphonate Is Cost Effective for 5 Years for All Women
Posted On: Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 12:14 by Beverly Murphy

Cost-Effectiveness of Oral Bisphosphonates for Osteoporosis at Different Ages and Levels of Life Expectancy.

J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug 30. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03571.x. [Epub ahead of print]

Pham AN, Datta SK, Weber TJ, Walter LC, Colón-Emeric CS.

From the Divisions of Endocrinology, Geriatrics, General Internal Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina; Department of Endocrinology, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia; Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Center for Health Services Research, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina; Division of Geriatrics, San...

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Categories: From the Literature

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