Lung Cancer Rates Decline Nationwide

According to a recent press release from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the rates of new lung cancer cases in the United States dropped among men in 35 states and among women in 6 states between 1999 and 2008.

For this report, researchers analyzed lung cancer data from the CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Instituteā€²s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. They estimated smoking behavior by state using the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Study findings include:
  • Among men, lung cancer rates continued to decrease nationwide.
  • From 1999 to 2008 lung cancer rates among men decreased in 35 states and remained stable in nine states (change could not be assessed in six states and the District of Columbia).
  • States with the lowest lung cancer incidence among men were clustered in the West.
  • After increasing for years, lung cancer rates among women decreased nationwide between 2006 and 2008.
  • Lung cancer rates decreased between 1999 and 2008 among women in California, Florida, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, and Washington.
  • Lung cancer rates among women remained stable in 24 states, and increased slightly in 14 states (change could not be assessed in six states and the District of Columbia).
The study was published in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Read the full report.